Reviews


“Every once and a while it can be refreshing to come across a film bereft of cynicism and negativity. Rosa Karo’s magical modern day fairy tale The Italian Key hits the positivity button and aims to utilize enchantment as entertainment. Much to my surprised delight, it succeeds across the board.

Having The Italian Key come my way just made my day, for the lack of cynicism I expressed above. Additionally, everything about this film is beautiful to behold, from the actors cast in the film to the locations to the color palette. The film feels like a cheery, fun Masterpiece Theatre episode, or maybe more appropriately Muppet Classic Theater (not for the use of Muppets, this film has none, but for the enjoyment I got out of it).

Overall, I found The Italian Key to be a wonderful film-watching experience, and the gorgeous imagery continues to pop into my head long after the film has stopped running. I don’t think it’s for everybody; you have to be able to appreciate something more pleasant and cheery, with a strong emphasis on “love” as the dominant theme, and sometimes it ain’t cool to admit that you’re capable. I get that, so no problem here. For me, though, this film is aces, and I’m glad I got to take the ride.”     

- Mark Bell, Film Threat

Read the full 'Film Threat' review

 

“Karo’s primary goal in the feature was to bring about sensations of happiness, joy and fulfillment without the use of sex, drugs or violence – or any action for that matter. The film’s largest conflict is waylaid in moments and the film resumes it’s peaceful trotting pace towards the end.

What could be confused as a boring, melodious feature, The Italian Key manages to touch upon emotions of belonging, curiosity, and love. The film’s score by Tuomas Kantelinen is masterfully executed to match the majestic landscape of Italy and the deeply rooted emotions of the feature. The stunning visuals of the Italian landscape and a surprise subplot in India really carry this feature. One can’t help but feel pulled into the textures and quiet moments of the film.”  

- Kyle Reese, Sound on Sight

Read the full 'Sound on Sight' review

 

"The Italian Key, an enjoyable romantic film - kind of a nostalgic period piece that shows audiences the beauty of life. While the demographic may be predictable, the premise and its many themes and storylines give the film a distinctly European style."

- Independent Film Quarterly Magazine

Read writer-director Rosa Karo's full interview in 'Independent Film Quarterly'

 

"Indie filmmakers like Rosa Karo realize that they are the ones who must carry the torch when it comes to smaller films that rely on imagination more than CGI or violence. Karo’s “The Italian Key,” which has had distribution throughout Europe, is unapologetically old-fashioned, relying on gorgeous scenery and lingering scenes to convey a mood and to tell a compelling story."

- Film Slate Magazine

Read Rosa Karo's full interview in Film Slate Magazine

 

THE ITALIAN KEY STILLS

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Cabella (Gwendolyn Anslow) visits key maker Magnani to find the lock that fits her key.
Cabella (Gwendolyn Anslow) visits key maker Magnani to find the lock that fits her key. 
Leo (Leo Vertunni) and Cabella (Gwendolyn Anslow)eat brunch at the villa.
Leo (Leo Vertunni) and Cabella (Gwendolyn Anslow)eat brunch at the villa. 
Lord Jai (Moose Ali Khan) eats alone in his castle.
Lord Jai (Moose Ali Khan) eats alone in his castle. 
Cabella (Gwendolyn Anslow) and Maria (Joana Cartocci) read 'The Prophet' on the mountain top.
Cabella (Gwendolyn Anslow) and Maria (Joana Cartocci) read 'The Prophet' on the mountain top. 
Sophia (Elisa Cartocci) attends Lord Jai's party.
Sophia (Elisa Cartocci) attends Lord Jai's party. 
Cabella (Gwendolyn Anslow) and Maria (Joana Cartocci) on the village piazza.
Cabella (Gwendolyn Anslow) and Maria (Joana Cartocci) on the village piazza.